Burn after reading: Activists set fire to Owen Jones book as row over transgender candidates heats up

Leading members of hard left group the Campaign for Labour Party Democracy are set for a showdown at its AGM this Saturday in a bitter dispute over the status of trans people.

Leading members of hard left group the Campaign for Labour Party Democracy are set for a showdown at its AGM this Saturday in a bitter dispute over the status of trans people.

CLPD executive member Jennifer James sparked the row by launching a campaign to ban trans women from all-women shortlists, leading to her suspension from the Labour Party. Now James, who has spoken alongside Labour’s Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott at a fringe event, is pushing for her own proposals on Labour’s approach to trans people to be officially adopted by the CLPD at its AGM this Saturday 3rd March.

The acrimonious row has seen James threaten opponents saying “say it to my face one time and you’ll find out”, while a supporter of hers burned a copy of Owen Jones’ book following statements of support for trans women in Labour.

James’ motion is opposed by CLPD member Max Shanly, who has called on other members of the hard left to “consider joining CLPD today and turning up at the AGM on the 3rd March to help the voices of reason clear out the transphobes and cranks”. James immediately shot back with her own call for supporters to attend the meeting.

Saturday’s AGM is set to attended by Tottenham councillor and Harringey HDV opponent Seema Chandwani, Assistant General Secretary of Unite the union Steve Turner, member of the TUC General Council Maria Exall, Ann Henderson from the Scottish TUC and Editor of the Morning Star Ben Chacko.

The outcome of the meeting is far from clear however, not least because the Campaign for Labour Party Democracy does not list motions to be debated or the membership of its executive committee on its website.

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